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Frogg Toggs Amphib Review : Duck hunting waders by wadinglab.com

The Frogg Toggs Camo Amphib Waders were definitely a piece of gear I was looking forward to review. I have a few friends wearing them for hunting, so it was easy for me to get my hands on this pair of chest waders. Also, all of them seemed to be totally convinced that in terms of price/performance ratio, these are the number one, when you are looking for mid-range neoprene waders. Still, I will try my best to give you my unbiased opinion.

 

Frogg toggs amphib waders

Specs:

  • 3.5mm Neoprene Fabric combined with polyester jersey shell
  • Stitched, glued and taped triple-finished seams
  • 600 gram Thinsulate Insulation in attached boots
  • reinforced knee pads

 

Construction Of The Frogg Toggs Amphib

3.5mm Neoprene waders combined with insulated boots: Frogg Togg tried to make equipment, that you can wear even under tough and cold conditions. If you live in moderate climate with exceptional cold days and you need more than just waterproof protection, this is the right choice of material. In contradiction to the 5mm neoprene, which is also very popular, you should be able to walk from fishing spot to fishing spot without overheating too much, at least when it’s not summer.  The camo patterns used here, are standard “Realtree” types and should be suitable for most occurrences. The knees a reinforced with rectangular kneepads, and combined with the neoprene used here, are undeniably durable enough for duck hunting, or other material challenging occasions. The seams are glued, taped and stitched which is common for these products. All in all you definitely feel like you hold a quality product in your hands. The pair I borrowed for this review was already used a few times for hunting and still looked like it came right out of the box.

 

Fitting

I ordered one size bigger than my usual size for boots and the fitting was good. A lot of people do not know, that slightly longer legs are intended to protect the seams from stretching too much, and that is exactly what Frogg Togg aimed for in the Amphibs.

 

Features

Frogg toggs amphib wadersThe boots come insulated with 600 gram “Thinsulate Ultra” which provides enough warmth for longer fishing sessions. Since they are already attached, you do not have to worry about debris or stones entering your boots and therefore gravel guards are not needed. One item less you have to worry about! They are also surprisingly comfortable since the boots are fairly high and have good sized collars, that prevent them from pressing too hard against you legs, which can be a problem during longer fishing sessions. The ankle support is unfortunately not what you would wish for.

Shoulder straps are adjustable and made from neoprene as well, and are secured on the inside. When you are hunting this could turn out to be a problem considering the two rings, meant to attach a shell holder, are on the outside around the same height. As soon as you attach said shell holder, the velcro used here might get pulled off, depending on the weight of the attachment. I used it to attach a line clipper, which it was perfect for.

As usual, these chest waders come with the typical front pocket, including a storage pocket, as well as bilateral handwarmer pockets for colder days. A wading belt is not included, and should be purchased separately, do not go wading without one!

 

How The Frogg Toggs Amphib Perform In the stream

If there is one thing where the Frogg Toggs Amphib overperform, it is insulation. They are made for cold temperatures. I made the mistake, to try them on a normal late summer/early fall day and even though I fished early in the morning, with no direct sun around, I still started to sweat. If you need something for winter outdoor activities, this is the right pair.

As most neoprene waders, they are pretty flexible and did not limit my movement at all.

 

Pros:

  • Durable material and reinforced knee pads
  • Well insulated boots
  • Good flexibility for neoprene waders

Cons:

  • Bad placement of rings for the shell holders

 

Final Review Of The Frogg Toggs Amphib

There are barely any arguments against them, and I certainly see why I heard so much good about this product. If you want neoprene waders with boots for under 200 dollars, this is honestly the best you can get. The Frogg Toggs Amphib feel like something way more worth, and could easily compete with items from around the 300 dollars price range. No matter if you plan on duck hunting or fly fishing, you can’t really go wrong here and that is why they are also included in my list of best duck hunting waders.

4 Fish You Need to Handle With Care

4 Fish You Need to Handle with Care

As a newbie fisherman, you would probably think that every fish has to be handled in the same way. After all, they are essentially just fish, right? Well, not exactly – while some of them you have seen on TV as being equipped with some whiskers or just harmless spikes, they are capable of hurting you, causing great pain, and even killing you if you are not paying attention.

Every fish has to be handled in a special way. First of all, because you wouldn’t want it to escape, and then because you wouldn’t want it to bite, sting, or even poison you. If you are a more experienced angler and have decided to go for a bigger, more exotic catch, here are some things you have to know.

Below, we will present you four of the fish that must be handled with extreme caution – be sure to follow our advice and you shouldn’t have any serious issues with them.

Lionfish

While quite mesmerizing to look at, the Lionfish is capable of giving you a sting – or more – that you will never forget. It has venomous spines that emerge from the sides and the back of the body.

Their numbers have increased in Miami and Virginia, but they are native to other places. For example, in the Dominican Republic, the waters are so populated with Lionfish that the locals simply refuse to swim as they fear of being accidentally stung by one.

The Lionfish has no natural enemies and it can basically feast on every reasonably-sized sea creature around it – studies show that they can eat up to 30,000 smaller fish in only one year.

They are considered pretty tasty, so you might find yourself with a fresh Lionfish ready to be cooked on your table. The necessary precautions you have to take consist of gloves, which should be worn for the entire time you are handling the fish.

Before starting to fillet the fish, you will have to carefully remove all of the venomous spines – you can do so using a pair of scissors. If you happen to be stung by a Lionfish, you should apply hot water to the area that’s been stung, for around thirty minutes. However, if the pain won’t go away, it is recommended that you go and see a doctor.

Bullhead Catfish

Catfish, in general, have three spines that are able to puncture your skin. They have two lateral spines and a dorsal one. And when we say that they can puncture your skin, we mean that they can reach very deep if you are not paying attention.

There has been one case of death caused by the spines of a catfish. After managing to hunt down a catfish, two brothers started to play catch with it. One of the two, as he was catching the fish, brought his arms closer to his chest in order to have a safer grip on it, and then one of the spines punctured his chest, and then his heart, killing him on the spot.

If handled with care, as in using your fishing gloves, the spines won’t touch your skin and, therefore, do you no harm. When it comes to the Bullhead Catfish, it is unlikely that its spines will kill you – however, they can leave you in pain for several days.

If stung, you must clean the wound so that it doesn’t get infected. After that, all you have to do is analyze the stung area as the days pass – if the area begins to swell and if the pain continues, you should seek medical care.

Barracuda

Barracudas come with pointy, sharp teeth and are able to jump over your boat when you are not paying attention. This type of fish is often used by anglers, or other types of people that have a boat, to entertain the ones that accompany them.

This is because, once a lure is set above the water or even close to the surface, you will most likely see a barracuda emerging from the water as they bite onto the lure with fast speed and extreme ferocity, after which they go into a vertical leap and back into the water.

You won’t probably use your highest quality fishing lures on this fish, because some fishers out there don’t even bother removing them if the Barracuda has a good grip on the lure. However, if you still want to extract it, you should be using some pliers in order to avoid being injured.

If you’ve caught one in your fishing net and want to unhook it, it’s best that you leave some larger fish in the net before you approach the barracuda. It is also recommended that you leave the net partially submerged as the fish can start struggling violently when removed out of the water.

Also, a very important thing for you to remember is to treat the fish with TLC. You can do so when they get closer to the boat, as it will be the place where they will be doing one final jump out of the water. If you catch a smaller one, you can just grab it from behind its head – but you should still wear gloves and be very careful.

Alligator Gar

One Alligator Gar can reach weights of over 200 pounds – and the fact that its head is shaped like an alligator’s one will make you wonder if you really want to catch this one.

There have been reports of people that have been attacked by this fish, especially in Louisiana, in Lake Pontchartrain. They are known to send aggressive bites toward the ones that disturb them – of course, in self-defense.

Handling an Alligator Gar can be quite difficult, as there are some necessary steps you have to follow to ensure your safety. First of all, you will have to use a stout tackle on a fish like this, mainly because of the needle-like teeth it comes equipped with. As it is quite a large fish, it is advised that you never try landing one of them.

Some of them can get quite jumpy, so to say, and will start struggling, using all the power they have stored in them.

We mentioned that they have aggressive bites, so you should gill gaff them so that you can control their head properly and avoid being bitten.

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https://bullbuster.net/community/articles/how-to/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-shimano-tld-seriesAuthor: Bullbuster Team

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE SHIMANO TLD SERIES

The Shimano TLD In Depth

This is a classic shimano reel that has found its way around the world like many other Shimano products. What makes this reel so special is its dependability and the fact that it has very little need for maintenance. Its performance compared to cost was unrivaled for years until reel companies like PENN started releasing similar style reels one could only guess because of the TLD’s extraordinary success.

What Is Inside A Shimano TLD?

This is the best video on the internet explaining the Shimano TLD. It goes into depth on the history of the TLD’s manufacturing, how to perform maintenance on it. Thanks to Aussie “ Fishing Gear Tester” for putting together this great video.

Types Of Shimano TLD’s

Shimano TLD  – This is the classic one speed TLD Reel.

Shimano TLD

Models (Scroll Down For Line Capacities):

TLD 15

TLD20

TLD25

Shimano TLDII (2 Speed Shimano TLD)

Shimano TLDII (Two Speed Reel)

TLDII (Scroll Down For Line Capacities):

TLD20IIA

TLD30IIA

TLD50IIA

TLD50IILRSA

Shimano TLD Star

Shimano TLD Star

Models (Scroll Down For Line Capacities):

TLD1530S

TLD2040S

What Type Of Fishing Should I Use This Reel Series For?

The Shimano TLD is a pretty versatile reel series.  The best application for a TLD is as a trolling reel.  However you can use them for bottom fishing, landbased fishing for sharks and bull reds, as well as inshore fishing for big jacks, tarpon, bull reds, and barracuda.

Monofilament Line Capacities For The Shimano TLD

Below is a table with the braided line capacities for the Shimano TLD. Find out the Monofilament Line capacity of other Shimano Reels.

Monofilament Line Capacities For Shimano TLD Reels

Braided Line Capacities For The Shimano TLD

Below is a table with the braided line capacities for the Shimano TLD.  Find out the Braided Line Capacity Of Other Shimano Reels.

Braided Line Capacity Of Shimano Reels

How To Service A Shimano TLD:

Video That Shows You How To Service A Shimano TLD 15

This video by “Jamie D Offshore”  shows you how to service a Shimano TLD15.  Also you can enjoy some Classic Rock while watching it!

Video That Shows You How To Change The Bearings On A TLD 25 : 

This video by “TJ Shultz” shows you how to change the bearings on a TLD25. There is no classic rock in the video, but its still a great video.

We Help Millions Of Anglers Spend More Time Fishing

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Need Monofilament Fishing Lines For Your Next Trip Offshore?

If you are going to make the trip all the way offshore, preparation is key. Make sure all of your reels have fresh monofilament on them.  We know that you are busy thats why we have devised the brand direct system to make sure that your monofilament lines show up on your doorstep when you need them.

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If you are planning on bottomfishingjiggingdeep dropping, or have a go to rod that you want to use over and over again without spooling, chances are braid is for you.  Get our braided fishing lines delivered directly to your doorstep.

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some fish recipe from the great Paul Prudhomme

Blackened redfish and 9 other inspirational recipes from chef Paul Prudhomme

1
4.6kshares

Every Louisiana cook who turns the heat up high to make a roux pays homage to the man who changed Louisiana – and American – food and cooking. Chef Paul Prudhomme, who died Oct. 8 at age 75, inspired hundreds of imitation Cajun restaurants spotted across America like a teenager’s unfortunate skin. But his greatest achievement may be that he taught Americans how to cook, taste and to season their food in a new way.

Through his best-selling cookbooks,  nationally televised PBS cooking shows filmed at WYES-TV, a generation of chefs and home cooks learned from the man whose ebullient personality and love of food showed in everything he did.

Several readers have suggested a statue of the country’s first celebrity chef would be a fitting replacement for any Confederate general. Here’s an immediate idea: Pay respects to the great man by making dinner.

The Times-Picayune printed lots of his recipes, most with stories written by Dale Curry, who retired as food editor in 2004. She interviewed Prudhomme countless times and wrote this in an appreciation of the chef’s contributions: “Nothing was too fresh or too much trouble. He might tell a cook to crack two fresh coconuts or debone eight rabbit legs; this was Prudhomme’s purist approach.”

O

One of his earliest recipes — and likely his most famous — nearly wiped the redfish off the Gulf fisheries map. It accompanied Curry’s story about the 1984 publication of his first cookbook, “Chef Paul Prudhomme’s Louisiana Kitchen,” which became a best-seller.

Prudhomme’s cooks didn’t have time to spend half an hour stirring a roux, so he taught them, and us, to heat the oil for five minutes then add the flour, stirring madly with a long-handled whisk.

His recipe signature for Blackened Redfish, however, was seasoning. Curry compared the complexity of his recipes with Julia Child’s, as many referred to two or three other recipes for stock or a seasoning mix, and most had a long list of herbs and spices. (The redfish recipe had nine.)

Below are four recipes from that 1984 story, plus six more from our files. Of particular interest may be the ones from 2000, from his “Louisiana Tastes” cookbook, in which he included detailed notes on how the dishes should taste.

What other chef has done this?

Prudhomme’s palate can be compared to a musician’s perfect pitch. His seasonings mixes facility in Elmwood ships products around the world, in bulk for foodservice as well as the familiar consumer sizes. Restaurant chains and other food manufacturers hired Prudhomme to create custom seasoning mixes, for entire menus or special items.

His K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen on Chartres Street remains a draw for locals and visitors from around the world.

Paul Prudhomme, superstar chef remembered Watch as fans from Alaska to New Jersey reminisce about superstar chef Paul Prudhomme, who fathered the Cajun food phenomenon that swept the nation in the 1980s, from his home base at K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen restaurant in the French Quarter. For details of Prudhomme’s career search NOLA.com for the story: “Internationally known chef Paul Prudhomme dies at age 75.”

The tastes he created live on in many ways, changing the complexion of America’s food. These recipes and the many others in his cookbooks are one way the chef’s legacy will endure, more than a statue on a pedestal ever could.

*

From The Times-Picayune, April 5, 1984.

The cookbook includes this note: Redfish and pompano are ideal for this method of cooking. If tilefish is used, you may have to split the fillets in half horizontally to have the proper thickness. If you can’t get any of these fish, drum, salmon steaks or red snapper fillets can be substituted. In any case, the fillets or steaks must not be more than 3/4 inch thick.

Blackened Redfish

Makes 6 servings

3/4 pound (3 sticks) unsalted butter, melted in a skillet

Seasoning mix:

1 tablespoon sweet paprika

2-1/2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon ground red pepper (preferably cayenne)

3/4 teaspoon white pepper

3/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves

6 (8- to 10-ounce) fish fillets, preferably redfish, pompano or tilefish, cut about 1/2-inch thick

Heat a large, cast-iron skillet over very high heat until it is beyond the smoking stage and you see white ash in the skillet bottom (the skillet cannot be too hot for this dish), at least 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, pour 2 tables

One of his earliest recipes — and likely his most famous — nearly wiped the redfish off the Gulf fisheries map. It accompanied Curry’s story about the 1984 publication of his first cookbook, “Chef Paul Prudhomme’s Louisiana Kitchen,” which became a best-seller.

Prudhomme’s cooks didn’t have time to spend half an hour stirring a roux, so he taught them, and us, to heat the oil for five minutes then add the flour, stirring madly with a long-handled whisk.

His recipe signature for Blackened Redfish, however, was seasoning. Curry compared the complexity of his recipes with Julia Child’s, as many referred to two or three other recipes for stock or a seasoning mix, and most had a long list of herbs and spices. (The redfish recipe had nine.)

Below are four recipes from that 1984 story, plus six more from our files. Of particular interest may be the ones from 2000, from his “Louisiana Tastes” cookbook, in which he included detailed notes on how the dishes should taste.

What other chef has done this?

Prudhomme’s palate can be compared to a musician’s perfect pitch. His seasonings mixes facility in Elmwood ships products around the world, in bulk for foodservice as well as the familiar consumer sizes. Restaurant chains and other food manufacturers hired Prudhomme to create custom seasoning mixes, for entire menus or special items.

His K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen on Chartres Street remains a draw for locals and visitors from around the world.

Paul Prudhomme, superstar chef remembered Watch as fans from Alaska to New Jersey reminisce about superstar chef Paul Prudhomme, who fathered the Cajun food phenomenon that swept the nation in the 1980s, from his home base at K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen restaurant in the French Quarter. For details of Prudhomme’s career search NOLA.com for the story: “Internationally known chef Paul Prudhomme dies at age 75.”

The tastes he created live on in many ways, changing the complexion of America’s food. These recipes and the many others in his cookbooks are one way the chef’s legacy will endure, more than a statue on a pedestal ever could.

*

From The Times-Picayune, April 5, 1984.

The cookbook includes this note: Redfish and pompano are ideal for this method of cooking. If tilefish is used, you may have to split the fillets in half horizontally to have the proper thickness. If you can’t get any of these fish, drum, salmon steaks or red snapper fillets can be substituted. In any case, the fillets or steaks must not be more than 3/4 inch thick.

Blackened Redfish

Makes 6 servings

3/4 pound (3 sticks) unsalted butter, melted in a skillet

Seasoning mix:

1 tablespoon sweet paprika

2-1/2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon ground red pepper (preferably cayenne)

3/4 teaspoon white pepper

3/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano leaves

6 (8- to 10-ounce) fish fillets, preferably redfish, pompano or tilefish, cut about 1/2-inch thick

Heat a large, cast-iron skillet over very high heat until it is beyond the smoking stage and you see white ash in the skillet bottom (the skillet cannot be too hot for this dish), at least 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, pour 2 tablespoons melted butter in each of 6 small ramekins; set aside and keep warm. Reserve* the remaining butter in its skillet. Heat the serving plates in a 250-degree oven.

Thoroughly combine seasoning mix ingredients in a small bowl. Dip each fillet in the reserved melted butter so that both sides are well coated; then sprinkle seasoning mix generously and evenly on both sides of the fillets, patting it in by hand. Place fish in the hot skillet and pour 1 teaspoon melted butter on top of each fillet (be careful, as the butter may flame up).

Cook, uncovered, over the same high heat until the underside looks charred, about 2 minutes (the time will vary according to the fillet’s thickness and the heat of the skillet). Turn the fish over and again pour 1 teaspoon butter on top. Cook until fish  is done, about 2 minutes more. Repeat with remaining fillets. Serve each fillet while piping hot.

To serve, place one fillet and a ramekin of butter on each heated serving plate.

Blackened Gulf fish is still a popular dish at K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen on Chartres Street. (NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune Archive)

*

Cajun Seafood Gumbo With Andouille Smoked Sausage 

Makes 10 main-dish or 20 appetizer servings

2 cups chopped onions

1-1/2 cups chopped green bell peppers

1 cup chopped celery

SEASONING MIX: 

2 whole bay leaves

2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon white pepper

1/2 teaspoon ground red-pepper (preferably cayenne)

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves

1/4teaspoon dried oregano leaves

3/4 cup vegetable oil

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon minced garlic

5-1/2 cups basic seafood stock (recipe follows)

1 pound andouille smoked sausage (preferred) or any other good pure smoked pork sausage such as polish kielbasa, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 pound peeled medium shrimp

1 dozen medium to large oysters in their liquor, about 9 ounces

3/4 pound crabmeat, picked over

2-1/2 cups cooked rice for serving

Combine onions, bell peppers and celery in a medium-size bowl. In small bowl combine the seasoning mix ingredients.

Heat oil in a large heavy skillet over high heat until it begins to smoke, about 5 minutes. Gradually add flour, whisking constantly with a long-handled metal whisk. Continue cooking, whisking constantly, until roux is dark red-brown to black, about 2 to 4 minutes, being careful not to let it scorch or splash on your skin. Immediately add half the vegetables and stir well (switch to a spoon if necessary). Continue stirring and cooking about 1 minute. Then add remaining vegetables and cook and stir about 2 minutes. Stir in seasoning mix and continue cooking about 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add garlic; stir well, then cook and stir about 1 minute more. Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, place stock in a 5-1/2-quart saucepan or large dutch oven. Bring to a boil. Add roux mixture by spoonfuls to the boiling stock, stirring until dissolved between each addition. Bring mixture to a.boil add andouille and return to a boil; continue boiling 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes more.

Add shrlmp, undrained oysters and crabmeat. Return to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and skim any oil from the surface. Serve immediately.

To serve as a main course, mound 1/4 cup rice in the middle of each serving bow. Spoon 1 cup gumbo over the top, making sure each person gets an assortment of the seafood and andouille. Serve half this amount in a cup as an appetizer.

Seafood stock: In a stock pot or large saucepan, combine about 2 quarts cold water with vegetable trimmings from the recipe(s) you are serving, or 1 medium onion, unpeeled, quartered; 1 large clove garlic, unpeeled, quartered, 1 rib celery. Add 1-1/2 to 2 pounds rinsed shrimp heads and/or shells, or crawfish heads and/or shells, or crab shells (2-1/2 to 3 quarts), or rinsed fish carcasses (heads and gills removed, or oyster liquor or any combination of these.

Bring to a boil over high heat, then gently simmer at least 4 hours, preferably 6. Replenish water as needed to keep about 1 apart of liquid in the pan. The pot may be uncovered or set a lid on it askew. Strain, cool and refrigerate until ready to use.

Cajun Meat Loaf

Makes 6 servings

SEASONING MIX:

2 whole bay leaves

1 tablespoon salt

1 teaspoon ground red pepper (preferably cayenne)

1 teapoon black pepper

1/2 teaspoon white pepper

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

MEAT LOAF:

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

3/4 cup finely chopped onions

1/2 cup finely chopped celery

1/2 cup finely chopped bell peppers .

1/4 cup finely chopped green onions

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce

1 tablespoon Worchestershire sauce

1/2 cup evaporated milk

1/2 cup ketchup

1-1/2 pounds ground beef

1/2 pound ground pork

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 cup very fine dry bread crumbs

Combine seasoning mix ingredients in a small bowl.

Melt butter in a 1-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add onions, celery, bell peppers, green onions, garlic, Tabasco, Worcestershire and seasoning mix. Saute until mixture starts sticking excessively, about 6 minutes, stirring occasionally and scraping the pan bottom well. Stir in milk and catsup. Continue cooking about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.

Place ground beef and pork in an ungreased 13-by-9-inch baking pan. Add eggs, cooked vegetable mixture (removing the bay leaves) and bread crumbs. Mix by hand until thoroughly combined. In the center of the pan, shape mixture into a loaf about 1-1/2 inches high, 6 inches wide and 12 inches long. Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 25 minutes, then raise heat to 400 and continue cooking until done, about 35 minutes longer. Serve immediately.

justin wilson fishing with dynamite

The Game Warden and Cajun fish story

Alvin Blaine

 


From:
Picture Rocks, Arizona, USA

Post  Posted 5 Oct 2002 2:20 pm    
Reply with quote

A Cajun, leaving a bayou, was recently stopped by a game warden in Southern
Louisiana. The Cajun had two ice chests of fish. The game warden asked the
man, “Do you have a license to catch those fish?” The Cajun replied, “Naw,
ma fren, I ain’t got none of dem, no. Dese are my pet fish.” “Pet fish?” the
warden replied. “Ya. Avery night I take dese here fish down to de
bayou and let dem swim ’round for a while. I whistle and dey jump rat back
into dere ice chests and I take dem home.”
“That’s a bunch of hooey! Fish can’t do that!” The Cajun looked at the game
warden for a moment and then said, “It’s de truth ma’ fren, I’ll show you.
It really works.” “Okay, I’ve GOT to see this!” the curious game warden
said. The Cajun poured the fish into the bayou and stood and waited. After
several minutes, the game warden turned to him and said, “Well?” “Well,
what?” said the Cajun. “When are you going to call them back?” The game
warden asked. “Call who back?” the Cajun asked.
“The FISH.” the irritated game warden answered. “What fish?”
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Paul Graupp

 


From:
Macon Ga USA

Post  Posted 5 Oct 2002 6:22 pm    
Reply with quote

Reminds me of the one where a game warden in disguise went fishing with a good ole boy and when they were out on the river, the GOB reached under his seat for a stick of dynamite, lit it and threw it into the river.

The game warden told him who he was and that he couldn’t do that. GOB got a second stick, lit it and handed it the the game warden………

Are you gonna sit thar or are you gonna fish ??

Boudreax and Tibodaux go hunting with Boudreax’s new labrador hunting dog. Man Tibodaux this is the best Dad Gum dog I ever had. He’s so smart I can send him out to a pond and he’ll come back to us and tell us how many ducks are in dat pond. Tibodaux looks at Boudreax like he’s plum crazy, “Well I ain’t never hurd of such a ting, forgive me Boudreax but I just don’t believe you” “Man I’m sure sorry to hear that, I guess I’ll just have to showed you”.

Boudreax goes and gets his black labordor hunting dog out ot the truck, grabs him by the collar and whispers something in his ear. That little hunten dog gets all excited, jumped up and schoom! ran full bore speed into the marsh. A couple of minutes later that dog comes back, ARF wags his tail a bit and another ARF. What that crazy dog doing Boudreax? He’s telling me that there is one duck in that there pond, man you still crazy as far as I can see, I just don’t believe you.

Boudreax grabs the dog, whispers something in the corner of its ear and sends the dog to the pond on the other side of the road. Couple of minutes later the dog comes back, gets all excited ArF, ArF and wags his tail. See I told you Tibodaux, there are two ducks in that pond. Man my friend that dog is amazin, never seen dat before, I garontee. Tell him to go see how many ducks are in that pond over there.

Boudreax grabs the collar of the black labador hunting puppy, whispers in his ear and schoom off he runs again into the marsh. This time a bit of time passes when finally out comes the dog all excited. The hunting puppy picks up a stick and starts swing it around, beating the side of the truck and just going crazy. Man Boudreax, your dog dun went crazy what’s wrong wit him, heen?

Der aint a damb ting wrong with dat dog hes just trying to tell us “There so many ducks in that pond you can’t shake a stick at em”

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SAMSFX FISHING MAKING YOUR FISHING MORE SIMPLER & EFFICIENT

Description:
4 in 1 multi functional nippers come with smooth retractable zinger, must have tool for fishermen
Durable 420 stainless steel construction nipper, consolidates gear into one easy to useful fast knot tying tool
Features hook sharpener, line snips, jig eye cleaner and fast knot tying tool combo
Retractable 32″/ 80cm nylon cord for smooth & quiet extension, 1.5 oz/ 45g retraction force
Great for attach to neck lanyard, belt loop, fly fishing vest or backpack, easy to hang any time

 

Pay Attention:
Please allow 0.4-0.8 ” (1-2 cm) differences due to manual measurement
Recommended to take a little polishing or sharpen before using it
In future use, the blade can be repeated polishing and sharpened

Tips:
Come with paper instructions in the pack
For more knotting methods, please refer to the video

Specifications:
Retractable Reel:
Dimension: 3.80″×1.49″×0.50″/ 9.7×3.8×1.28cm
Weight: 0.8oz / 23g
Fly Nipper:
Dimension: 2.56″×0.51″×0.35″/ 6.6×1.3×0.9cm
Weight: 0.5oz / 13g

Package:
You will get 1 piece x Fly Fishing Knot Tying Tool and 1 piece x Fishing Zinger Retractable Clip
OPP packing